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Monday, April 16

  1. page Miep Gies edited ... Miep and the other helpers could have been executed if they had been caught hiding Jews; howev…
    ...
    Miep and the other helpers could have been executed if they had been caught hiding Jews; however, she was not arrested because the police officer who came to interrogate her was from Vienna, her birth-town. Apart from the shock and heartbreak for her friends, nothing happened to her.
    After the Franks were arrested, Miep’s task continued. She climbed the attic stairs one more time to retrieve Anne’s writings, finding them scattered on the floor. Miep quickly gathered up the notebooks and kept them for Anne’s expected return after the war. When she learned of Anne’s death in Bergen-Belsen, Miep gave Otto Frank, his daughter’s notebooks. Ever since, Miep has mourned the cruel fate of her friends in the attic. “Every year on the fourth of August, I close the curtains of my home and do not answer the doorbell or the telephone,” she said. “It is the day that my Jewish friends were taken away to the death camps. I have never overcome that shock.”
    ...
    a Righteous Gentile.
    On
    Gentile.On January 11,
    {http://miep-gies.ememorials.in/userfiles/john/miep%20gies.jpg}
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miep_Gies#Hiding_the_Families
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    2:40 am
  2. page Miep Gies edited Miep Gies (born Hermine Santrouschitz) was born in 1909 in Vienna, Austria. In December 1920, she …
    Miep Gies (born Hermine Santrouschitz) was born in 1909 in Vienna, Austria. In December 1920, she was sent to Leiden, Holland, as part of a relief program to help malnourished children and to escape the food shortages in Austria, following World War One. She lived there with a host family, to whom she grew to love very much and who later adopted her. They gave her the name Miep, feeling Hermine was too formal. In 1922, she moved with her adopted family to Amsterdam.
    Miep, her husband Jan Gies, and her family friends, Victor Kugler, Johannes Kleiman, and Bep Voskuijl helped hide her boss Otto Frank, his daughters Margot and Anne and some friends Hermann and Auguste van Pels, their son Peter and Fritz Pfeffer in a secret upstairs room of Opekta's office building, on Amsterdam's main channels from July 1942 to August 4, 1944. Opekta was the company ran by Otto Frank and where Miep worked. In an interview, Miep said she was glad to help the families hide because she was extremely concerned about them seeing what was happening to the Jews in Amsterdam. Every day, she saw trucks loaded with Jews heading to the railway station from where the trains left for concentration camps. Nobody, not even her own parents, knew about the people she was hiding. Miep avoided suspicion in many ways, for example by visiting several different suppliers a day and not buying everything from the same place. She kept the workers at the factory from being suspicious by trying not to enter the hiding place during office hours. She brought food from the black market and her husband also helped her by providing ration cards illegally.
    Miep and the other helpers could have been executed if they had been caught hiding Jews; however, she was not arrested because the police officer who came to interrogate her was from Vienna, her birth-town. Apart from the shock and heartbreak for her friends, nothing happened to her.
    After the Franks were arrested, Miep’s task continued. She climbed the attic stairs one more time to retrieve Anne’s writings, finding them scattered on the floor. Miep quickly gathered up the notebooks and kept them for Anne’s expected return after the war. When she learned of Anne’s death in Bergen-Belsen, Miep gave Otto Frank, his daughter’s notebooks. Ever since, Miep has mourned the cruel fate of her friends in the attic. “Every year on the fourth of August, I close the curtains of my home and do not answer the doorbell or the telephone,” she said. “It is the day that my Jewish friends were taken away to the death camps. I have never overcome that shock.”
    Miep’s message in her Wallenberg Lecture is one of hope: “I feel strongly that we should not wait for our political leaders to make this world a better place.” Miep Gies has been honoured around the world for her moral courage. In Israel the Yad Vashem Memorial pays tribute to her as a Righteous Gentile.
    On January 11, 2010 Miep Gies passed away at the age of 100 in the Netherlands.
    {http://miep-gies.ememorials.in/userfiles/john/miep%20gies.jpg}
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miep_Gies#Hiding_the_Families
    http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/biography/Miep_Gies.html
    http://www.miepgies.dk/

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    2:37 am

Sunday, April 15

  1. page Oskar Schindler edited ... Oskar Shindler 1908-1974 the unlikely hero Oscar Schindler was born a German on April 28 …
    ...
    Oskar Shindler
    1908-1974
    the unlikely hero
    Oscar Schindler was born a German on April 28 1908 in zwittau Austria Hungary. schindler grew up privileged to money, he was catholic but from an early age lived a world of sin. He married Emilie schindler at nineteen, though he was never without a mistress or shy to hard drinking or gambling, winning big and losing bigger. He wanted to make money and seemed like every other German industrialist; driven by profit and unmoved by the means of that.
    When oskar was in Poland he quickly connected with some of the Gestapo members softening them up with women money and alcohol, his new found friends allowed him to acquire a factory which he ran with the cheapest labor around in that time, the Jewish.
    ...
    German front.
    Removal of Jews to death camps had only just begun, Schindlers accountant set him up with a few Jewish friends who still had some wealth remaining, they invested in his factory and in return they would work there in the hopes that they would be spared, he paid off German soldiers and listed all the Jewish work efforts as "essential", so they would allow them to stay in Krakow. Schindler was making money, all this Jews were fed and none were beaten.
    By the autumn of 1944, Germany's hold on Poland had weakened. As the Russian army approached, the Nazi's tried desperately to complete their program of liquidation and sent all remaining Jews to die. But Schindler remained true to the “Schindlerjuden,” the workers he referred to as “my children.”
    After the liquidation of the Krakow ghetto and the transfer of many Jews to the Plaszow concentration camp, Schindler used his influence to set up a branch of the camp for 900 Jewish workers in his factory in Zablocie and made his now famous list of the workers he would need for its operation and success.
    When the war ended, Schindler fled to Argentina with his wife and a handful of his workers and bought a farm. In 1958, he left his land, his wife and his mistress to return to Germany. He spent the remaining years of his life dividing his time between Germany and Israel, where he was honored and taken care of by his “Schindlerjuden.”
    biography
    http://www.auschwitz.dk/schindler2.htm
    http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10005787
    http://www.notablebiographies.com/Ro-Sc/Schindler-Oskar.html

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    6:24 am
  2. page Oskar Schindler edited ... Oskar Shindler 1908-1974 Oscar Schindler was born a German on April 28 1908 in zwittau Aust…
    ...
    Oskar Shindler
    1908-1974
    Oscar Schindler was born a German on April 28 1908 in zwittau Austria Hungary. schindler grew up privileged to money, he was catholic but from an early age lived a world of sin. He married Emilie schindler at nineteen, though he was never without a mistress or shy to hard drinking or gambling, winning big and losing bigger. He wanted to make money and seemed like every other German industrialist; driven by profit and unmoved by the means of that.
    When oskar was in Poland he quickly connected with some of the Gestapo members softening them up with women money and alcohol, his new found friends allowed him to acquire a factory which he ran with the cheapest labor around in that time, the Jewish.
    Something changed in Oskar during the war and he ended up spending all he had to save his 1300 Jewish men and women. Schindlers factory was called the Emalia factory which supplied enamel goods and munitions to the German front.
    Removal of Jews to death camps had only just begun, Schindlers accountant set him up with a few Jewish friends who still had some wealth remaining, they invested in his factory and in return they would work there in the hopes that they would be spared, he paid off German soldiers and listed all the Jewish work efforts as "essential", so they would allow them to stay in Krakow. Schindler was making money, all this Jews were fed and none were beaten.
    By the autumn of 1944, Germany's hold on Poland had weakened. As the Russian army approached, the Nazi's tried desperately to complete their program of liquidation and sent all remaining Jews to die. But Schindler remained true to the “Schindlerjuden,” the workers he referred to as “my children.”
    After the liquidation of the Krakow ghetto and the transfer of many Jews to the Plaszow concentration camp, Schindler used his influence to set up a branch of the camp for 900 Jewish workers in his factory in Zablocie and made his now famous list of the workers he would need for its operation and success.
    When the war ended, Schindler fled to Argentina with his wife and a handful of his workers and bought a farm. In 1958, he left his land, his wife and his mistress to return to Germany. He spent the remaining years of his life dividing his time between Germany and Israel, where he was honored and taken care of by his “Schindlerjuden.”

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    6:11 am

Saturday, April 14

  1. page Jozef Mironiuk edited ... Bibliography: http://menmedia.co.uk/manchestereveningnews/news/s/1120851_hero_who_defied_the_…
    ...
    Bibliography:
    http://menmedia.co.uk/manchestereveningnews/news/s/1120851_hero_who_defied_the_nazis
    http://books.google.com.au/books?id=iitQhYsM-dMC&pg=PA645&lpg=PA645&dq=Jozef+Mironiuk&source=bl&ots=mMwSMNdyMB&sig=CuuHANkIj0_GrpqO0jFYc4yWUag&hl=en&sa=X&ei=IE6KT9nUDM_mmAXu6dW1CQ&ved=0CFsQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=Jozef%20Mironiuk&f=false
    http://www.youtube.com/v/daaFF0FMEb8&rel=0&hl=en_US&feature=player_embedded&version=3"></param><param
    http://books.google.com.au/books?id=iitQhYsM-dMC&pg=PA645&lpg=PA645&dq=Jozef+Mironiuk&source=bl&ots=mMwSMNdyMB&sig=
    CuuHANkIj0_GrpqO0jFYc4yWUag&hl=en&sa=X&ei=IE6KT9nUDM_mmAXu6dW1CQ&ved=
    0CFsQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=Jozef%20Mironiuk&f=false
    http://www.youtube.com/v/daaFF0FMEb8&rel=0&hl=en_US&feature=player_embedded&version=
    3"></param><param

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  2. page Jozef Mironiuk edited Jozef Mironiuk {Mironiuk.jpg} Hero defined means, "A man of distinguished courage or abi…

    Jozef Mironiuk
    {Mironiuk.jpg}
    Hero defined means, "A man of distinguished courage or ability, admired for his brave deeds and noble qualities." This is how many people see Jozef Mironiuk to be. Mr Jozef Mironiuk risked his life to hide Jews during the Holocaust. Jozef Mironiuk was a Polish man who lived on the outskirts of Krakow, he was aged 19 at the time of his heroic act of saving the Jews. Jozef was the eldest of eight brothers and sisters. Mr Mironiuk risked the death penalty of himself and his family to hide three Jewish men on their farm for 18 months straight. He created a secret room and an underground ‘bunker’ to keep them from the concentration camps. Jozef and his family were constantly fearful for their lives, he said "I was constantly afraid. I slept in my shoes and clothes, ready to escape if the Germans came to arrest me. In such times there are a lot of heroes. But I do not consider myself a hero.”
    The Holocaust claimed the lives of approximately 6 million Jewish men, women and children… 1.6 million were Jewish children. Of these, only about 11 percent of Jews survived the war, most left their homes to seek refuge in other countries. A majority of parents chose to hide their children in order to save them. If you were caught hiding a Jew during the Holocaust there would be a number of consequences, none of them being good… Usually if you were caught, you would be killed onsite along with the Jews or even publicly executed to serve as a warning to others not to also try and help Jews avoid the concentration camps.
    Jozef Mironiuk speaking at Manchester Jewish Museum, where he was launching the Polish Heroes exhibition, said: "It's much harder to find a friend during war so have friends now then they will help you. It was not bread or milk these people needed, it was survival."Jozef became the head of his family after his father was beaten to death by Nazis, is when he gave shelter to the three Jewish men who escaped from a slave labour camp. They stayed in hiding until 1944 (when the front line moved).
    The three men survived and finally moved to the US.
    Mr Jozef Mironiuk told his story of his experience during the Holocaust to people from around the world until the day he died in 2009. For this act of bravery during The Holocaust Jozef and his family were recipients of the ‘Righteous Among Nations’ award.
    "The message is simple," he said. "Do whatever you can to make sure there's peace.”
    Bibliography:
    http://menmedia.co.uk/manchestereveningnews/news/s/1120851_hero_who_defied_the_nazis
    http://books.google.com.au/books?id=iitQhYsM-dMC&pg=PA645&lpg=PA645&dq=Jozef+Mironiuk&source=bl&ots=mMwSMNdyMB&sig=CuuHANkIj0_GrpqO0jFYc4yWUag&hl=en&sa=X&ei=IE6KT9nUDM_mmAXu6dW1CQ&ved=0CFsQ6AEwCQ#v=onepage&q=Jozef%20Mironiuk&f=false
    http://www.youtube.com/v/daaFF0FMEb8&rel=0&hl=en_US&feature=player_embedded&version=3"></param><param

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    9:31 pm
  3. file Mironiuk.jpg uploaded
    9:22 pm
  4. page Hans & Sophie Scholl and the White Rose Movement edited {hans_sophie_christ.jpg} Hans & Sophie Scholl and the White Rose Hans Scholl, the founder…
    {hans_sophie_christ.jpg}
    Hans & Sophie Scholl and the White Rose
    Hans Scholl, the founder of the White Rose was born on the 22nd of September 1918 and his sister Sophie on the 9th of May 1921. They were of a German ethnicity and born in Ingersheim. Their father Robert Scholl, mayor of Forchtenberg, was a critic of the Nazi regime, which was influential on his children.
    Despite their parent’s beliefs, Hans and Sophie Scholl, like other young Germans joined the Hitler Youth in 1933 as they thought their leader, Hitler, was leading Germany back to greatness. They quickly became disillusioned when they discovered the true meaning of the group and how Hitler was leading the Germans to a ‘road of destruction’.
    In the summer of 1942, Sophie, Hans, Willi Graf, Kurt Huber, Christopher Probst and Alexandra Schmorell co-authored an anti-Nazi political resistance leaflet. Going by the name, the White Rose, they encouraged and instructed Germans to resist the Nazi regime. The leaflet contained an anonymous essay that said, the Nazi system had slowly imprisoned the German people and was now destroying them. At the bottom of the essay, the White Rose requested people to make as many copies of the leaflet as possible and distribute them. The six anti-Nazi leaflets were dispensed around the University of Munich, where they studied, and The University of Hamburg. They also mailed leaflets to doctors, pub owners and scholars’ throughout their country. They were careful to remain anonymous, because for such acts they knew the consequences would have been immediate death as they were going against the Nazi Party.
    On the 18th of February 1943, Hans and Sophie were seen throwing leaflets from an atrium at their university by a caretaker. They were arrested by the Gestapo, which were the secret state police of the Nazi Party. They were trialed for treason by Judge Freisler, a notorious Nazi Party lawyer and judge, and found guilty. They were condemned to death on the 22nd of February and were executed 4 hours later. Christopher Probst, a member of The White Rose, and the siblings were beheaded by Johann Reichhart in the Stadelheim Prison. Hans’ last words were, ‘Long Live Freedom’ and his sister, Sophie’s were ‘How can we expect righteousness to prevail when there is hardly anyone willing to give himself up individually to a righteous cause. Such a fine, sunny day, and I have to go, but what does my death matter, if through us thousands of people are awakened and stirred to action?’ ‘The sun still shines’.
    http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/jsource/Holocaust/rose.html
    http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10007188
    http://www.holocaustresearchproject.org/revolt/scholl.html

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    9:08 pm
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